All the Birds and Abandoned Silos

M making new friends.
M making new friends.

Joel’s Journal - Entry #154 - 4/2/2017

“There’s not much to take pictures of here is there?”

She spoke through the bars running horizontally across the gap in the concrete. I’d crawled through, by lifting myself up and then using the bar as a grip in order to shimmy in between them and lower myself down.

Above me, the walls of the abandoned silo cut a cookie cutter circel of blue sky. The sun pushed a shadow of arching light across the wall.

Beneath my feet, the uneven stones and moss were marshy and damp, the smell was moist in my nose. Assorted empty beer bottles and garbage were littered about.

M was right, there really wasn’t much here. Still, it’s not everyday you get to stand in the middle of an abandoned grain silo. 

I passed her my camera and climbed back out. Crumbling walls and the shattered remantns of a foundation are all the remain of what was once probably a farmhouse.

Now, it’s merely a pile of rubble off the beaten path at Lynde Shores. I’d noticed the concrete silo sticking up above the wall of trees that seemed intent on swallowing it and wanted to go check it out.

It was such a gorgeous day with the sun beaming and warmth finally starting to push away the clinging winter that M and I decided we’d find something to do outside on our way back from Kitchener. We’d been out walking with Jude through my old neighborhood, along the same paths that I used to take on a daily basis to get to school, and the warmth of the day called to us.

The parking lot was rammed full when we arrived, and cars had already started to fill up the shoulder as well as a vacant construction parking lot across the road. We got lucky and someone pulled out just as we got there.

It wasn’t long before we realized that almost the entire town of Whitby had the same idea as us on this beautiful day.

I didn’t mind though, I had M’s fingers entwined in my one hand and my camera in the other, the sun was beaming on my face and the birds were chirping like crazy in the trees around us. Geese fluttered about in the water, honking at one another and chasing away the smaller ducks. Chickadees flitted about in the trees waiting for the next set of fingers to cling to and seeds to snatch, that is, if they weren’t already taking advantage of the piles of birdseed left behind by previous hikers.

And my mission was birds. I only had my zoom lens on me, so that meant I was looking to get some great, crisp close-ups with buttery blurry backgrounds. Or, for the photographically inclined, I was on the hunt for bird shots with some beautiful bokeh. Something like this 👇.

 

Red-winged Blackbird.
Red-winged Blackbird.

Anyone who has seen me in a t-shirt will know that I love birds. I’ve loved birds and have been a pretty avid birdwatcher since I was 12. I saved all of my money throughout the year in order to buy my first Audubon bird guide on my family’s camping trip that summer.

Anyway, it’s a hobby that I don’t generally have too much time for, while I could probably tell you the name of the multitude of birds that sing from the trees in your backyard (many with only needing to hear them) I don’t get much time to get out there and really enjoy them, to really just watch them. I see them everyday, but I rarely get the chance to appreciate them, that’s probably the best way to put it.

So today, I snapped as many photos of birds as I could, and also took some time to feed the chickadees, one of my favourites.

M and I stayed out on the trails for a solid couple hours and by the end of it, I think I was fairly successful in my final bird count. Here’s a few more samples.

 

Mallard.
Mallard.
Mallard from afar.
Mallard from afar.
Common Pigeon.
Common Pigeon.
Canada Geese.
Canada Geese.

However, all the walk and all the sunlight has drained my energy like a sponge and I need to get a good sleep to wake up and slay this Monday. So, with that, I’ll tell you to keep doing what you love and doing it well, and thanks for reading!

J.J.W.

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